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Content tagged with music streaming

Spotify: Independent Music Friend or Foe?

Spotify LogoIn the last year, the Swedish music platform Spotify has gained considerable media attention in the United States with their free online streaming service. Although many are hailing it as a great way of discovering new artists and music, many are also criticizing the site claiming that it fails to properly compensate independent artists.

Spotify offers a free service that can be accessed online, while access from a mobile device requires a paid “premium” membership. Furthermore, the paid membership allows you to bypass the video and audio advertisements that are present with the free account.

In 2010, Napster founder Sean Parker invested $15 million in Spotify’s development, and has since been involved by sitting on their board. Spotify cracked the ten million user mark that same year, with a quarter of the accounts belonging to paying customers. After many delays and years of negotiation with major record companies, the site finally launched its US version in July 2011.

Spotify compensates artists via their record labels by paying for both downloaded content and streaming. In some countries, record companies have marked a significant increase in revenue since joining Spotify. Not everyone is happy however, American rock duo The Black Keys have gone as far as pulling their newest album El Camino off the site. So why are so many speaking out against Spotify?

Grooveshark.com Offers Music Streaming Platform that Promotes Independent Artists

Have you been looking for a site that offers Pandora-like features with advanced promotional tools that benefits independent artists? Gooveshark.com is the site you are searching for.

GrooveShark provides a user-friendly platform for both music fans and artists. Fans can easily search for bands, view popular music on the site and search for artists under their favorite music category. The site offers an array of genres such as classical, rock, rap and electronica. Music fans are able to:

Mogwai’s On Ustream, And You Should Be, Too

watchersDid any of you follow the whole Old Spice Man nuttiness that went down a few weeks ago? Old Spice used the online popularity of their recent commercials to stage a social media blitz. They invited users from all the major social networks on the web to ask questions to the Old Spice Man, and he answered them via YouTube videos.

The unique thing about the Old Spice Man videos was the speed with which they were released. Someone asked a question on Twitter, and minutes later, a hilarious video response was up on YouTube. Social media experts say this campaign was so successful because there is an ever-growing demand for live and real-time video online.

What Does This Have To Do With Music?

We’ve finally hit that point where our computers and internet connections are fast enough for live streaming video to actually be successful. And people love it. The reality and the intimacy of this type of connection – not just with friends, but with brands and celebrities and political figures – is slated to be the next big thing. Which is why it’s time for musicians to get on board.

Music Streaming Blogs Being Shut Down

The Random, Troubling Antics of the IFPI and How They Impact Indie Artists.

rsstunesSomething sinister has been going on in the indie music blogosphere this February. And not just this February. Rumors and conjecture and suspicious activity have been noted on the periphery of web consciousness since the start of the new year.

As noted last week by The Guardian, several major music blogs have been shut down, randomly and suddenly, due to a takedown notice sent to Google by the IFPI.

Just when you thought the RIAA was getting a little soft.

The IFPI is the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry. Basically a bunch of guys using international law to threaten Google. In response, Google took down six music blogs hosted on its Blogspot service, including relative non-offenders like I Rock Cleveland and Masala.